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A Workshop to Explore Food-Fish Aquaculture in Minnesota

Purpose

The purpose of the workshop was to kick-start Minnesota's fledgling food-fish industry by gathering national and local experts in food-fish aquaculture and aquaponics. Participants included experts from academia, growers from the upper Great Lakes states, staff from Minnesota state agencies that license and regulate aquaculture programs and a variety of businesses interested in learning more about the growing aquaculture industry from each other.

One of the major questions posed to workshop participants was "Can an environmentally responsible and sustainable food-fish aquaculture industry be established in Minnesota, and if so, what might be the best ways to proceed."

Themes

Three major themes of the workshop were to:

  1. Prioritize production strategies and species for food-fish aquaculture and aquaponics in Minnesota.
  2. Identify research needs and information gaps to address for successful food-fish aquaculture and aquaponics in Minnesota, and other Midwest states
  3. Identify policy and regulatory issues to promote food security and an environmentally responsible aquaculture and aquaponics program in Minnesota.

Workshop Organization

The workshop began with an introductory presentation and two overviews on the present status of aquaculture in the United States. Keynote presentations were given for each of the three major theme areas, followed by a panel of experts who discussed their perspectives on each theme, and a breakout session in which participants were divided among four different groups for more focused discussions.

Questions for each breakout group were prepared to initiate discussions and focus the conversation. Participants were also encouraged to brainstorm and develop creative responses to questions related to each theme area. Each breakout group had a facilitator and a recorder and after the breakout sessions were completed, each group's information was summarized and reported back to all participants for further discussion.

Synthesis Document

A synthesis of the workshop, along with conclusions will be published and made available on this page of the Minnesota Sea Grant website in the Fall of 2017.

Contact

Don Schreiner, Minnesota Sea Grant Fisheries and Aquaculture Specialist, schr0941@d.umn.edu

Videos View as playlist on YouTube

Links to selected workshop video presentations and mini bios of each presenter are below. The videos are also available as a playlist on Minnesota Sea Grant's YouTube channel.


Welcome and Introduction
John A. Downing, Director, Minnesota Sea Grant.

John's research and teaching dossiers concern many aspects of the aquatic sciences. His 150+ peer-reviewed books and journal articles cover diverse topics in limnology, marine science, environmental economics, and terrestrial ecology. He has founded and run several small businesses in the U.S. and Canada and has a long-standing record of success in securing research funding from federal, state, provincial, and local agencies. His family has conserved and managed a shore-habitat and forest area in northern Minnesota for 108 years.


The Role of the USDA in Aquaculture: An Overview
Caird Rexroad III, National Program Leader for Aquaculture, USDA Agriculture Research Service

Caird has served in various roles since joining ARS in 1998 where his primary research focused on the use of molecular genetics in breeding programs seeking to improve production efficiencies of agriculture animals. He currently works in the Office of National Programs and oversees an aquaculture research portfolio that includes 10 laboratories across the nation. He has a B.S. in biology from Abilene Christian University and a Ph.D. in genetics from Texas A&M University.


National Challenges in Aquaculture
Carole Engle, Manager, Engle-Stone Aquatic$

Carole has worked in aquaculture research, extension and teaching for more than 35 years, primarily through the lens of her expertise in economics and marketing. She has worked closely with aquaculture businesses around the world and values the contributions that science has made to the growth and development of successful aquaculture businesses. She is the editor of the Journal of the World Aquaculture Society.


Increasing Farmed Fish Production: Prioritizing Production Strategies and Species
Steven Summerfelt, Director, Aquaculture Systems Research, Freshwater Institute, The Conservation Fund

Steve is a professional engineer and holds a Ph.D. in civil engineering (environmental emphasis) and M.S. and B.S. degrees in chemical engineering. He is one of five recipients of the Aquacultural Engineering Society Award of Excellence. He is working on innovative technologies to increase farmed fish production in closedcontainment systems that practically eliminate water pollution, minimize water use, improve freshness and safety and allow the farm to be located adjacent to the market.


Production Strategies and Species
Chris Hartleb, Director, Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility and Aquaponics Innovation Center, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Chris has been a professor of fisheries biology, water resources, and sustainable and resilient food systems at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point for the past 21 years. He has a B.S. in biology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a M.S. in zoology from the University of New Hampshire and a Ph.D. in fish ecology from the University of Maine. He also coordinates the aquaculture minor and professional aquaponics certificate programs at UW-Stevens Point.


Research and Information Needs
Chris Hartleb, Director, Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility and Aquaponics Innovation Center, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

Chris has been a professor of fisheries biology, water resources, and sustainable and resilient food systems at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point for the past 21 years. He has a B.S. in biology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a M.S. in zoology from the University of New Hampshire and a Ph.D. in fish ecology from the University of Maine. He also coordinates the aquaculture minor and professional aquaponics certificate programs at UW-Stevens Point.


Increasing Farmed Fish Production: Prioritizing Research and Needs
Steven Summerfelt, Director, Aquaculture Systems Research, Freshwater Institute, The Conservation Fund[

Steve is a professional engineer and holds a Ph.D. in civil engineering (environmental emphasis) and M.S. and B.S. degrees in chemical engineering. He is one of five recipients of the Aquacultural Engineering Society Award of Excellence. He is working on innovative technologies to increase farmed fish production in closedcontainment systems that practically eliminate water pollution, minimize water use, improve freshness and safety and allow the farm to be located adjacent to the market.


Perspectives on Aquaculture Policy, Regulatory and Food-Security Issues
Carole Engle, Manager, Engle-Stone Aquatic$

35 years, primarily through the lens of her expertise in economics and marketing. She has worked closely with aquaculture businesses around the world and values the contributions that science has made to the growth and development of successful aquaculture businesses. She is the editor of the Journal of the World Aquaculture Society.

Aquaculture:

Topic Highlights:

Contact:

Don Schreiner
Fisheries Specialist


This page last modified on August 15, 2017     © 1996 – 2017 Regents of the University of Minnesota     The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.
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